Joseph Smith Chronology

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On November 28, in the life of Joseph Smith

DATE

EVENT


November 28, 1841

Nauvoo, Illinois. At a meeting with the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Joseph Smith told the brethren "that the Book of Mormon was the most correct of any book on earth, and the keystone of our religion, and a man would get nearer to God by abiding by its precepts, than by any other book."


November 28, 1839

Washington, D.C. Joseph Smith arrived in the capital to present the Saints' petition to the United States government seeking redress for losses in Missouri.


November 28, 1842

Nauvoo, Illinois. Joseph Smith held a daylong trial at his house concerning the unequal distribution of provisions among the temple workers.

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 5:196-97
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

November 28, 1843

Nauvoo, Illinois. Joseph Smith and the brethren prepared a "memorial" for Congress that included an account of their history and grievances with the state of Missouri.

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 6:84-97
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

November 28, 1834

Geauga County, Ohio. Lake v. Smith: The parties and their attorneys attended a Justice of the Peace court before Justice of the Peace J. C. Dowen. Proofs and allegations were heard, and court was adjourned until December 4, 1834.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

November 28, 1840

Nauvoo, Illinois. Nauvoo High Council: Robert D. Foster was accused of slandering the authorities of the church and for other unchristianlike conduct and evidences were heard.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

November 28, 1842

Nauvoo, Illinois. City of Nauvoo v. Hunter: Joseph Smith submitted a complaint to alderman and Justice of the Peace William Marks, claiming that Thomas J. Hunter had breached Nauvoo's "ordinance concerning vagrants and disorderly persons" when stating Joseph Smith was an imposter and swindler. Joseph Smith claimed the accusations injured his moral and religious character.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch