Joseph Smith Chronology

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On July 22, in the life of Joseph Smith

DATE

EVENT


July 22, 1840

Nauvoo, Illinois. After William W. Phelps requested forgiveness, Joseph Smith dictated a letter granting that forgiveness and inviting him to return to the Church.

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 4:162-64
Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, Joseph Smith pp. 508-10
Joseph Smith History C1:1082–1083
Letter to William W. Phelps, 22 July 1840

July 22, 1839

Commerce, Illinois to Montrose, Iowa. Joseph Smith, Wilford Woodruff, and others miraculously healed the Saints of illnesses that had taken hold on both sides of the Mississippi River; this day is known as a great day of healing in Church history.

Sources:
Remembering Joseph: Personal Recollections of Those Who Knew the Prophet Joseph Smith, Mark L. McConkie pp. 123-24
Wilford Woodruff Journal 1:347-48
"Sickness and Faith, Nauvoo Letters," Ronald K. Esplin, BYU Studies 15:4
Joseph Smith's Prophetic Gifts: His Prophecies Fulfilled, Pat Ament p. 78
Joseph Smith History C1:964
Joseph Smith, Journal, 21 and 22–23 July 1839

July 22, 1842

Independence, Missouri. Missouri Governor Thomas Reynolds issued a requisition to Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin for the extradition of Joseph Smith and Orrin Porter Rockwell in connection with the Boggs shooting.

Sources:
LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

July 22, 1837

Geauga County, Ohio. Cahoon, Carter and County for use of Smith v. Draper: Joseph Smith obtained a summons against Marvin C. Draper for payment of a promissory note made payable to Cahoon, Carter & County for $4.49 and it was returned "served by copy."

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

July 22, 1842

Nauvoo, Illinois. Nauvoo City Resolution: Upheld the character of Joseph Smith, and organized petitions to the Governor not to issue a writ against Joseph Smith.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch