Joseph Smith Chronology

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On March 28, in the life of Joseph Smith

DATE

EVENT


March 28, 1835

Kirtland, Ohio. Joseph Smith received the final portions of Doctrine and Covenants 107, a revelation concerning the order and offices of the priesthood.


March 28, 1834

Kirtland, Ohio. Joseph Smith praised the Lord that he found his family well when he returned from his journey to western New York.


March 28, 1843

Nauvoo, Illinois. Joseph Smith moved his office from the smokehouse to the small upper room of his Red Brick Store. Josiah Butterfield (stepfather of the Lawrence sisters who were later sealed to Joseph) came to Joseph's house and insulted him so outrageously that Joseph kicked Butterfield "out of the house, across the yard, and into the street."

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 5:316
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

March 28, 1837

Geauga County, Ohio. Holmes v. Dayton: Ezra Holmes filed a suit against Joseph Smith and his co-obligors in the Court of Common Pleas to collect on a promissory note, claiming damages of $500.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

March 28, 1837

Geauga County, Ohio. Patterson and Patterson v. Cahoon: George A. H. Patterson and John Patterson filed a suit against Cahoon, Carter & County, and Rigdon, Smith & Cowdery to collect on a promissory note claiming damages of $1,000.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

March 28, 1843

Geauga County, Ohio. Jacob Bump Administrator for the Estate of Stannard v. Brigham Young and Joseph Smith: Collection order returned to the court with no assets having been found.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

March 28, 1844

Carthage, Illinois. Simpson v. Smith: Alexander Simpson filed a declaration that Joseph Smith's charges of robbery, attempted murder, and felony against him had tarnished his reputation. [See State v. Simpson, January 17, 1844.] Smith entered a plea of not guilty. The plaintiff granted a change of venue to McDonough County on May 23, 1844.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch