Joseph Smith Chronology

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On September 1, in the life of Joseph Smith

DATE

EVENT


September 1, 1842

Nauvoo, Illinois. While in seclusion, Joseph Smith dictated a general epistle to the Church concerning the work of baptisms for the dead, which was later canonized as Doctrine and Covenants 127.

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 5:142-44
Doctrine and Covenants 127
Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, Joseph Smith pp. 570-73

About September 1, 1834

Kirtland, Ohio. Joseph Smith labored with other Church members to build the Kirtland Temple, acting as the foreman in the stone quarry.

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 2:161
Pioneer and Personal Reminiscences, Christopher G. Crary pp. 32-33

September 1, 1835

Kirtland, Ohio. Joseph Smith wrote an extensive letter to the elders in Missouri, explaining his actions and motives in settling the Saints there.

Sources:
History of the Church, Joseph Smith 2:253-72
Personal Writings of Joseph Smith, Joseph Smith pp. 368-74
Joseph Smith History B1:606–612
Letter to the Elders of the Church in Missouri, September 1835

September 1, 1838

Far West, Missouri. Joseph Smith traveled with the First Presidency to the halfway house of Waldo Littlefield in the Daviess County, ­Marrowbone Settlement, for the purpose of appointing another city of Zion as a place of refuge for the Saints.


September 1, 1840

Independence, Missouri. The successor to Lilburn W. Boggs, Missouri Governor Thomas Reynolds, initiated extradition proceedings against Joseph Smith and others by sending a requisition to Illinois Governor Thomas Carlin.

Sources:
LDS Church Archives, Joseph Smith Legal Papers series
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

September 1, 1837

Kirtland, Ohio. Halsted, Haines & County v. Granger: Joseph Smith signed as surety along with twenty-nine other people for a $2,251.77 promissory note. In a separate matter, Joseph Smith and others signed two additional promissory notes to Halsted, Haines & County on this date—one for $2,323.66 and another for $2,395.57.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

September 1, 1837

Geauga County, Ohio. Boynton and Hyde v. Smith: Joseph Smith became further indebted to Ray Boynton and Harry Hyde, who received John W. Howden's $825 note by assignment, for $1,200 total debt owed.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

September 1, 1842

Nauvoo, Illinois. In a letter addressed to "All the Saints in Nauvoo," Joseph Smith wrote that his enemies pursued him "without cause, and have not the least shadow, or coloring of justice, or right on their side."

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

About September 1843

Nauvoo, Illinois. State v. Joseph Smith: Joseph Smith was charged with forgery.

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch

September 1, 1845

Hancock County, Illinois. Almon W. Babbitt, Guardian for heirs of Edward Lawrence v. William Law, Joseph Coolidge: Almon W. Babbitt, acting as guardians for the Lawrence heirs, filed suit against the estates of Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith, and against William Law (based on Hyrum and Law's bond for Joseph Smith as guardian).

Sources:
Sustaining the Law: Joseph Smith's Legal Encounters, Gordon A. Madsen, Jeffrey N. Walker, and John W. Welch